The Journey Begins

July 21, 2017 – On the road again
The next adventure has begun and already we have made significant changes to our plans. Months ago, we decided on a 3 week tour through Montana, finishing with Glacier National Park for the last week. The morning we left, the weather forecast was showing mid 90s throughout Montana, which is really hot when we are planning to stay in primitive campgrounds with no hook ups (no A/C), especially, when Molly often gets left in the camper. We flipped our trip around to start in Glacier instead, where the temps were mid 80s due to higher elevation. Our decision to switch the trip around was confirmed on our way as we drove through significant smoke due to fires in Western Montana. So for now, we are going to enjoy Glacier and hope that the heat wave breaks and the fires are contained in the next 7-10 days. Otherwise, we may be considering a different destination for the latter half of our trip.

July 22, 2017 – Driving Day 2
1000 miles is a really long drive. We stretched it over 2 full days of driving. Even Mandi took a turn and drove the rig for 2 hours, which is more than she ever drove our last class A motorhome in the 3 years we had it. Books on tape help, but they also can make you sleepy. There’s no way around it, it’s just a long drive. While on a pit stop, we accidentally stopped at the memorial site of the Battle of the Little Big Horn (Custer’s Last Stand).

We lunched at Eddie’s Corner diner in Moore, MT, renowned for remaining open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year since 1951.
We knew the national park campgrounds sellout very early. On the off chance that someone left midday, we did drive in to Many Glacier Campground, the northeast section of the park. We learned the rules of getting a spot: you can arrive no earlier than 5am (earlier than that means you are camping which isn’t legal outside of a campground) to wait in line to get a campsite for the day. The camp hosts begin assigning spots at 7am. We followed signs to the closest campground we could find outside the park just to spend a short night. Elkhorn Cabins and Campground. Sounds very mountainous and typical. It was quite redneck! The only “campground” was 5 tent sites that were very difficult to access in a car. Basically, wherever you parked your car/camper, that was cool. You put $20 in an envelope and you’re good to go. The property was very beautiful, on a river. The cabins were walled with painted plywood. At the end of the long day, it was conveniently close and fit what we needed, but I certainly wouldn’t recommend it to anyone for longer than an overnight.

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